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Osmonds Lamitox any body else use it?.

 
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Felicity



Joined: 24 May 2013
Posts: 3
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 5:57 pm    Post subject: Osmonds Lamitox any body else use it?.  Reply with quote

I have been feeding my IR horse this since before Christmas after an old farmers recommended that his wife had been feeding it to their Lami pony for years and have never had another days laminitis since..I mentioned this to a friend who was quite clued up to the horrible disease and she said it would be no good and could cause more damage than harm due to it containing Iron Oxide.. It may be just the change in management but my boy seems (touches wood) to be doing okay on it?..Any thoughts?.
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The Laminitis Site
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PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Felicity,

I've never heard of this before, just looking at it now.  Do you have the actual amounts of the ingredients in say 1 kg or the tub or a serving, as these don't appear to be given on the website?  

I'll comment more later, but I believe your friend is correct - it's not something I would feed.  

Andrea
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Felicity



Joined: 24 May 2013
Posts: 3
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi..I cannot seem to find out any more info on it..It does seem to a bit laspe on details doesn't it..

Can you recommend another supplement that i could use instead please?.
He is also fed Mag Ox and Yea Sacc..

Sorry i have just re read this and i do not mean to sound so rude..lol
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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd advise not feeding anything if you don't know exactly what's in it.

The ingredients listed (without quantities) are:
Clinoptilolite - this is a zeolite, used for its absorbing properties, with seemingly little research relating to its use internally: http://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/herb/zeolite
According to this article, zeolites have been linked to cancer, pulmonary fibrosis and anaemia:
http://www.livestrong.com/article...side-effects-of-cellular-zeolite/
This research appears to suggest that zeolite could bind minerals in the digestive system, thereby leading to deficiencies:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16466456

Calcium Montmorillonite is a clay, used in cat litter.  In medical use it may absorb metals (so presumably it could also bind essential minerals?).

Iron oxide - horses on a forage diet and/or with access to soil are never deficient in iron - dietary iron deficiency has never been reported in an adult horse.  Iron is hepatotoxic (toxic to the liver) and may be implicated in the development of insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. PPID).

Vetoxan is a probiotic, seemingly mostly used for dogs?

Diamond V Probiotic Yeast - presumably this is yea-sacc or similar?

The website claims that "Researchers are almost universally agreed that changes in the microbial population in the hindgut of equines has some bearing on the susceptibility to animals being at risk from the onset of Laminitis."
No they aren't - ~90% of all laminitis is now considered to have an endocrine cause, i.e. high levels of insulin, whether EMS or PPID - this is controlled by limiting non structural carbohydrate/glucose ingestion and therefore insulin levels, or in the case of PPID, by correct diagnosis and treatment with pergolide.  Excess starch reaching the hind gut can cause changes in the microbial population of the large intestine, causing acidosis, but these cases are very rare, usually following a break in to the feed room.  

I wouldn't recommend feeding this product.

Insulin resistant horses need a low sugar/starch diet with correct levels of minerals, vitamins, protein and essential fatty acids.  This is usually best provided by hay that's either been analysed and shown to be less than 10% NSC, or that's been soaked in plenty of water to remove some of the sugars.  Some minerals are always low in hay and grass - these include copper, zinc, selenium and sodium.  In addition, hay is likely to be low in vitamin E, possibly also vitamin A, and IR horses may benefit from additional vit E, up to 2000 IU/day for a 500 kg horse.  Micronised linseed is probably the best way of replacing omega 3s that would normally be found in grass for a horse on a hay diet, omega 3 is thought to have anti-inflammatory properties.

So a suitable diet for a 500 kg horse that doesn't need to lose weight:
10 kg < 10% NSC hay
Several handfuls HiFi molasses free or similar to carry minerals, or rinsed/soaked/rinsed unmolassed sugar beet (to remove as much sugar as possible)
Recommended amount of a good balancer or mineral supplement - Spiller's Lite and TEN winter mix provide good levels of copper, zinc and selenium.
25 g salt - depending on the balancer, you will nearly always have to add additional salt, the minimum requirement for a 500 kg horse is 10 g sodium which is 25 g salt, or a good tablespoon.
50 - 200 g micronised linseed.  Many people buy linseed from Charnwood Milling.

Many balancers contain yea-sacc.  Most horses with good gut function don't need yea-sacc, but older horses may benefit, and it may be useful if the diet changes, or before and after e.g. worming or antibiotic use.

Extra magnesium may be added, most balancers contain around 3 g magnesium (in the recommended daily amount for a 500 kg horse), another 3 - 5 g might be reasonable to add, particularly for a horse that has a large crest as there is anecdotal evidence that magnesium may help reduce a large solid crest.

I am not aware of any laminitis supplements that have been proven to work.  The whole point of a supplement is that it supplements a correct basic diet, so always start by ensuring the daily diet meets all nutritional requirements.

You may be interested to read this article on supplements: http://www.thelaminitissite.org/2...2/there-are-no-magic-potions.html
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Felicity



Joined: 24 May 2013
Posts: 3
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your reply..I will stop feeding it today..He is on Mag and Yea Sacc and Benivit advanced (Multi Vit) so i think i will just stick to them..

It is all so very misleading and it promises to do wonders and keep the disease at bay..But it is like you say all a marketing ploy..

Your advice is very much appreciated..

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