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Carbohydrates in grass and hay

 
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2013 10:29 pm    Post subject: Carbohydrates in grass and hay  Reply with quote

http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/63/6/2363.long
Fluxes in central carbohydrate metabolism of source leaves in a fructan-storing C3 grass: rapid turnover and futile cycling of sucrose in continuous light under contrasted nitrogen nutrition status
Lattanzi et al. 2012

http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/43/2/525.full
Carbohydrate Metabolism and Efficiency of Photosystem II in Mown Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.)
Mark J. Howieson and Nick Edward Christians 2008

http://ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/...esentations/sugar_calibration.pdf

http://www.safergrass.org/pdf/AAEPposter.pdf
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 07, 2014 4:20 pm    Post subject: Research with grass sugar/carbs analysed Reply with quote

http://www.nap.edu/read/11653/chapter/10#142

http://www.midwestforage.org/pdfRschProj/13Legume-GrassMixtures.pdf


http://curis.ku.dk/ws/files/8097006/thesis_lc2236.pdf
Isolation and characterisation of Lolium perenne genes
involved in fructan metabolism
Ph.D thesis by
cand. tech. al.
Gitte Gadegaard Larsen
Store Heddinge 2007


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/do...1111/j.1469-8137.2005.01575.x/pdf
Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. Dissecting the regulation of fructan metabolism in
perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) with quantitative
trait locus mapping
L. B. Turner, , A. J. Cairns, I. P. Armstead, J. Ashton, K. Skøt, D. Whittaker, d M. O. Humphreys
2005
Fructan, Sucrose, glucose, fructose, WSC figs given for lolium perenne


http://www.asap.asn.au/livestocklibrary/2002/francis1B.pdf
Anim. Prod. Aust. 2002 Vol. 24: 73-76
NON-STRUCTURAL CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT OF A PERENNIAL RYEGRASS
CULTIVAR BRED FOR HIGH SUGAR LEVELS, COMPARED TO ‘NORMAL’
PERENNIAL RYEGRASS AND WHITE CLOVER
S.A. FRANCIS AB, D.F. CHAPMAN A , P.T. DOYLE B , B.J. LEURY A and A.R. EGAN A


Brazil:
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?s...t&pid=S0100-84042005000400010


Last edited by The Laminitis Site on Fri Oct 16, 2015 6:51 pm; edited 3 times in total
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2014 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://books.google.fr/books?id=1...esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

Carbohydrate Reserves of Grass - Dale Smith Ch 23
The Biology and Utilization of Grasses

Waite R, Boyd J. The water-soluble carbohydrates of grasses. I.—Changes occurring during the normal life-cycle. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 1953;4:197–204.

spring 1952 warmer temps, less rainfall - more growth (taller and faster - 10.2 cm April to 61 cm June) - NSC May/June 2-5%
spring 1951 cooler temps, more rainfall - less growth (10.2 cm April to 23 cm June) - NSC May/June 10-22%
NSC increases during periods with little or no growth, decreases with increased growth.

Fructan amount varied within each year in accordance with plant growth:
1951 fructan in fescue stems was ~22% of DM in mid May (vegetative state), but ~10% of DM mid June (floral development) - fructan storage stopped and stores used during this high energy demand period.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2014 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11219461

J Anim Sci. 2001 Feb;79(2):500-6.
Hydrolyzable carbohydrates in pasture, hay, and horse feeds: direct assay and seasonal variation.
Hoffman RM1, Wilson JA, Kronfeld DS, Cooper WL, Lawrence LA, Sklan D, Harris PA.
Carbohydrates may be hydrolyzed or fermented in the digestive tract, and this distinction is important for the evaluation of the diet of herbivores. Both hydrolyzable and fermentable carbohydrates are included in the nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) fraction as estimated by difference using proximate analysis. Our objectives were to measure hydrolyzable carbohydrates in forages and concentrates, to compare these values with nonstructural carbohydrate, to test for prediction of hydrolyzable carbohydrate concentration in forages from its near-infrared spectrum, and to examine seasonal variation of carbohydrates in pasture. Samples of forages (107) and concentrates (25) were collected, dried, ground, and analyzed for NSC (calculated as 100 - water - CP - fat - ash - NDF), hydrolyzable carbohydrate (CHO-H, direct analysis), and rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (NSC minus CHO-H). Hydrolyzable carbohydrate accounted for 97% or more of the NSC in the concentrates but only 33% in pasture and hay. A two-term polynomial equation fit all the data: CHO-H = 0.154 x NSC + 0.00136 x NSC2, R2 = 0.98, P < 0.0001, n = 132. In 83 pasture samples, CHO-H concentrations were predicted by near-infrared spectra with a calibration R2 of 0.97, a mean of 48 g/kg, and a SE of calibration of 3.5 g/kg DM. In pasture samples collected between September 1995 and November 1996, the coefficient of variation was 31% for both CHO-H and rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO-FR); the largest increments were 31 g/kg of CHO-H from September to October and 41 g/kg of CHO-FR from February to March. The increased risk of certain diseases, such as laminitis and colic, that have been previously associated with an abrupt overload of NSC may be more precisely attributed to CHO-H in grain concentrates, and to CHO-H as well as CHO-FR in pastures.

Full paper:
http://www.journalofanimalscience.org/content/79/2/500.long
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2014 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11219461

J Anim Sci. 2001 Feb;79(2):500-6.
Hydrolyzable carbohydrates in pasture, hay, and horse feeds: direct assay and seasonal variation.
Hoffman RM1, Wilson JA, Kronfeld DS, Cooper WL, Lawrence LA, Sklan D, Harris PA.
Carbohydrates may be hydrolyzed or fermented in the digestive tract, and this distinction is important for the evaluation of the diet of herbivores. Both hydrolyzable and fermentable carbohydrates are included in the nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) fraction as estimated by difference using proximate analysis. Our objectives were to measure hydrolyzable carbohydrates in forages and concentrates, to compare these values with nonstructural carbohydrate, to test for prediction of hydrolyzable carbohydrate concentration in forages from its near-infrared spectrum, and to examine seasonal variation of carbohydrates in pasture. Samples of forages (107) and concentrates (25) were collected, dried, ground, and analyzed for NSC (calculated as 100 - water - CP - fat - ash - NDF), hydrolyzable carbohydrate (CHO-H, direct analysis), and rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (NSC minus CHO-H). Hydrolyzable carbohydrate accounted for 97% or more of the NSC in the concentrates but only 33% in pasture and hay. A two-term polynomial equation fit all the data: CHO-H = 0.154 x NSC + 0.00136 x NSC2, R2 = 0.98, P < 0.0001, n = 132. In 83 pasture samples, CHO-H concentrations were predicted by near-infrared spectra with a calibration R2 of 0.97, a mean of 48 g/kg, and a SE of calibration of 3.5 g/kg DM. In pasture samples collected between September 1995 and November 1996, the coefficient of variation was 31% for both CHO-H and rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO-FR); the largest increments were 31 g/kg of CHO-H from September to October and 41 g/kg of CHO-FR from February to March. The increased risk of certain diseases, such as laminitis and colic, that have been previously associated with an abrupt overload of NSC may be more precisely attributed to CHO-H in grain concentrates, and to CHO-H as well as CHO-FR in pastures.

Full paper:
http://www.journalofanimalscience.org/content/79/2/500.long
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2014 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11219461

J Anim Sci. 2001 Feb;79(2):500-6.
Hydrolyzable carbohydrates in pasture, hay, and horse feeds: direct assay and seasonal variation.
Hoffman RM1, Wilson JA, Kronfeld DS, Cooper WL, Lawrence LA, Sklan D, Harris PA.
Carbohydrates may be hydrolyzed or fermented in the digestive tract, and this distinction is important for the evaluation of the diet of herbivores. Both hydrolyzable and fermentable carbohydrates are included in the nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) fraction as estimated by difference using proximate analysis. Our objectives were to measure hydrolyzable carbohydrates in forages and concentrates, to compare these values with nonstructural carbohydrate, to test for prediction of hydrolyzable carbohydrate concentration in forages from its near-infrared spectrum, and to examine seasonal variation of carbohydrates in pasture. Samples of forages (107) and concentrates (25) were collected, dried, ground, and analyzed for NSC (calculated as 100 - water - CP - fat - ash - NDF), hydrolyzable carbohydrate (CHO-H, direct analysis), and rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (NSC minus CHO-H). Hydrolyzable carbohydrate accounted for 97% or more of the NSC in the concentrates but only 33% in pasture and hay. A two-term polynomial equation fit all the data: CHO-H = 0.154 x NSC + 0.00136 x NSC2, R2 = 0.98, P < 0.0001, n = 132. In 83 pasture samples, CHO-H concentrations were predicted by near-infrared spectra with a calibration R2 of 0.97, a mean of 48 g/kg, and a SE of calibration of 3.5 g/kg DM. In pasture samples collected between September 1995 and November 1996, the coefficient of variation was 31% for both CHO-H and rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO-FR); the largest increments were 31 g/kg of CHO-H from September to October and 41 g/kg of CHO-FR from February to March. The increased risk of certain diseases, such as laminitis and colic, that have been previously associated with an abrupt overload of NSC may be more precisely attributed to CHO-H in grain concentrates, and to CHO-H as well as CHO-FR in pastures.

Full paper:
http://www.journalofanimalscience.org/content/79/2/500.long
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 6:52 pm    Post subject: Fructan and sugar contents in grasses Reply with quote

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/do...11/j.1469-8137.1989.tb00698.x/pdf
Nezv Phytol. (1989), 111, 3.S9 368
Occurrence of fructans in the Gramineae (Poaceae)
HEN K SMOUTE R AND RICHARD J. SIMPSON
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/....1146/annurev.pp.42.060191.000453
Pollock CJ, Cairns AJ. Fructan Metabolism in Grasses and Cereals. Annual Review of
Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology. 1991;42(1):77–101.


http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?s...t&pid=S1677-04202006000200006
Partitioning of water soluble carbohydrates in vegetative tissues of Lolium multiflorum Lam. ssp. italicum cv. Lema
Braz. J. Plant Physiol. vol.18 no.2 Londrina Apr./June 2006
Carla Zuliani Sandrin; Marisa Domingos; Rita de Cássia Leone Figueiredo-Ribeiro
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Full papers from 2010 conference - good papers on grass NSC content: http://www.europeangrassland.org/fileadmin/media/EGF2010_GSE_vol15.pdf
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 22, 2016 6:22 pm    Post subject: Info about grass species Reply with quote

http://alfalfa.ucdavis.edu/+symposium/proceedings/2005/05-167.pdf

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